Review: 2018 Food Loves Tech in Industry City Brooklyn

Cover image: Square Roots © Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC
With an impending food shortage crisis, global warming and conflict, sustainability and innovation are a major challenge. Food Loves Tech, now in its third year, is a beacon of inspiration bringing science, global activism and creativity into the food industry. Its mission is to push boundaries and challenge our senses.

© Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC

This year, Food Loves Tech came to Industry City, Brooklyn, one of New York’s booming neighborhoods. Vendors, chefs, farmers and innovators showcased everything from the sensible to the bizarre. From hydroponic gardens to crunchy insects, I found myself eating things I would have never tried before.
Jumping from booth to booth, I was particularly impressed by Square Roots – a Brooklyn-based urban farm that ingeniously uses less water and produces more. “Farmers are enough out there, but our goal is to educate more farmers to understand the good ways to produce the products, so we grow educated farmers,” the booth’s rep said. Square Roots offers farmers training to become sustainable and environmentally friendly. Through their educational program, farmers can learn to produce more crops, while wasting less.

Manna Fish Farms © Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC

Other sustainable veggie growers included Whole Foods and local grocery supplier Gotham Greens, based in New York and Midwest Chicago, who greeted visitors with generous packs of vegetables to take home.

On the subject of sustainability, perhaps no other food gets a worst rap than fish. Depleted stocks due to high demand, overfishing and climatic change all have contributed to declining fish populations. Although farmed fish like salmon is another alternative, it remains the scourge of fine dining restaurants whose chefs generally opt for the higher-quality wild. Organic salmon producer Manna Fish Farms is looking to change that with a variety of locally raised fish and shellfish off the Atlantic coast of Long Island. Using natural methods and healthy organic fish food, the salmon is of higher quality.

There was more than just farming at Food Loves Tech. My tastebuds were set on fire with some imaginative dishes from two of New York’s locally-sourced, eco-friendly restaurants.

They included Union Square-based Almond ‘s roasted duck served on a bed spicy kimchi. And Danny Meyer’s locavore favorite Untitled dished out a delicious potato salad made from vegetables grown in its LED-lit planters.

Almond’s spicy duck kimchi © Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC

Now for the truly bizarre. Brooklyn Bugs really pushed the bar way out with scorpions and crickets, which I happily missed, but the cocktail shrimps seasoned with salty crunchy ants was surprisingly good. Definitely interesting, but would it end up on my dinner table? I can’t say. The sight of boiled shrimp covered with crispy black ants on anyone’s plate would be unsurprisingly off putting. 

Brooklyn Bugs © Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC

How many times after eating shrimps and ants have you thought, “Gee I’m parched.”? There were plenty of beverages to choose from including Bulleit Frontier Whisky who has been making good old fashioned Kentucky Bourbon since the 1830s. Fans of classic stouts would love Long Island Blue Point Breweryincluding the Good Reef Ale and an Imperial Stout, which was rare to see.
On a sweeter note, Coombs Family Farm presented its spray canned maple syrup. This is an innovative product, but its environmental mission of preservation really impressed me. Rather than use the traditional metal tube for extracting maple sap, Coombs invented a soft plastic one that doesn’t damage the trees.

Bulleit Whiskey © Kei Hayashi for WhereNYC

The Food Loves Tech expo is rare treat to meet some country’s most innovative and ambitious individuals behind America’s new food revolution. While some ideas may have worked better than others, I left feeling pleasantly surprised with what I tasted. There is no doubt that these innovators are changing the way we look at food and helping our planet at the same time.
Kei Hayashi reported for this article.

Review: Goose Island Tasting Matrix with the Barnyard Collective

Cover image: © Spirikal for WhereNYC

“What does it mean to be a cheesemonger?” Adam Moskowitz, founder of the New York-based cheesemonger  Barnyard Collective, can’t resist answering his own question. “I wish could have a TED talk.” Before the evening of cheese and beer, Adam warns us, “If you’re bashful, this will be a whack night.”

Fondue at Goose Island © Spirikal for WhereNYC

© Spirikal for WhereNYC

Goose Island Barrel House © Spirikal for WhereNYC

We are at the Goose Island Barrel House, an amazing event space with a stunningly beautiful interior with a long bar and medieval style chambers. There is a small demo kitchen in front of the rows of long wooden tables in the main room. I can’t help but eye the walls lined with rustic, wooden barrels. At the back, guests are busy helping themselves to cheese and free Goose Island beer.

For some, cheese and wine may seem a more fitting pair, but beer is also an excellent accompaniment. Like crackers or bread, beer is also is made of grains and has a yeasty note and a slight fizz that complements cheese brilliantly.

I fill my plate of cheeses from Switzerland, Sweden, Spain and Belgium and choose a light, but slightly hoppy Sofie pilsner-style brew at the bar in the back and settle down in my seat, ready to hear the lecture.

Adam Moskowitz of the Barnyard Collective © Spirikal for WhereNYC

Most Chicagoans won’t probably know him, but Adam Moskowitz is cheese-crazed lunatic and industry expert who has been in the business for his whole life. He’s a self-described turophile, a connoisseur of cheese and naturally is “most happy when (he) eats cheese.” His Barnyard Collective, located at the Larkin Cold Storage in Long Island City, Queens, regularly hosts cheese talks and tastings with some of the East Coast and Europe’s most innovative artisanal cheesemakers such as Mateo Kehler of Jasper Hill and Cultivo Creamery who share their knowledge with the cheese community. 

O.G. Kristal from Belgium © Spirikal for WhereNYC

“If you’re a cheesemonger, you are a shaman.” Adam begins. Much of lecture covers the basics: the four kinds of cheese: sheep, cow, goat and water buffalo, the three types of production: industrial, artisanal and farmstead – and a bizarre amount diagrams and geeky memes. After a long while rambling on the history of cheese, the four main ingredients and how cool it is to work with cheese, he suddenly says, “(Cheesemongers) help people connect to good memories.” He’s right.

The collaboration between the Barnyard and Goose Island itself was a beautiful mariage of refreshing beer and creamy, sinful indulgence. This is a memory in the making.

The O.G. Kristal aged-gouda style from Belgium on my plate is a winner with a beautiful finish and textures of salt crystals and melty cheesy flavor that goes perfectly with a glass of Sofie.

Cheese pairing plates © Spirikal for WhereNYC

This is comfort food at its best. My seatmate has opted for the Goose Island dark colored Parker Porter whose caramel and burnt sugar aromas make a wonderful match with the sheep’s milk. And finally, the other crowd pleaser is the Belgian Trappiste style pale ale Matilda. Its radiant, golden color and slightly hoppy, bitter note would be nice foil to a washed-rind cheese like Grayson or a French Muenster.

There were more pairings of cheese and beer following the lecture organized by one of the other cheesemongers including a wonderful Cabot Clothbound Cheddar from Jasper Hill and a melt-on-your palette goat cheese that I washed down with my glass of Sofie. The finale was Adam’s molten, pungent cheese fondue which we greedily drizzled on our plates of roast potatoes, veggies, bread and pickles.

Goose Island beer and delicious cheese @Spirikal for WhereNYC

We take our final sips, bites and exchange a bit of small talk as the evening concludes. If cheesemongers are puppeteers and cheese are the characters in a cheese shop theatre, as Adam put it, then the result is pure, perfect harmony. And tonight will be another nice memory.

For upcoming beer events please visit Goose Island.